I Want My Country Back – NO!! Forward

I Want My Country Back – NO!! Forward

My dear friend Debbie, a talented woman, made T-shirts for us to wear to the recent gun law march in Santa Fe. And I must say that the youth who spoke and performed gave me much to look forward to in our country’s future. As we attempt to be optimistic in such combustible times, I reflect on this rally to boost my only sense of hope: our youth. The other day, I read essays printed in The New York Times written by college applicants. My sister commented, “I’m glad I’m not up against them!” They all wrote beautifully and from their hearts. Of course, these were applicants to the best of schools, but my relief in knowing that these young people can express themselves so well was palpable. I had thought that the ability to write and to speak was a quickly...

Facing History: What Do We Do About Injustice?

Facing History: What Do We Do About Injustice?

While in Boston last month for a book signing of Myopia, a memoir, I learned about an interesting organization called Facing History. It was started by a Boston elementary school teacher, and it has now become a global organization. Unfortunately, Albuquerque, New Mexico has no chapter. My new friend, Dr. Anna Ornstein, goes into Boston schools and speaks to junior high school and high school students about the Holocaust, racism, prejudice and what we can do about this now and in the future. As a survivor, she delivers a powerful message. She and her husband, the late Dr. Paul Ornstein, both survived the Holocaust with only one parent, she with her mother and Paul with his father. However, Paul was separated from his father for the duration of the war, and Anna’s...

An honor, and a precious moment in time: My book signing in Boston with Dr. Anna Ornstein

Boston is a wonderful city. Everything is close at hand, and one can walk almost everywhere. The museums are fabulous, as is the food, and the people are friendly and helpful. How exciting it was for me to be back there after so many years for a book signing. Earlier this month, I came to Boston to speak about my book Myopia, a memoir (IP Books) at Brookline Booksmith with Dr. Anna Ornstein, author of My Mother’s Eyes: Holocaust Memoires of a Young Girl (Published by Emmis Books, sold by IP Books). I wish I had taken more advantage of Boston while I was living in New York. Unfortunately, when we went to Back Bay to see the brownstone in which I had lived many years ago, it was the only building on the block that had been gutted. An extraordinary pairing It is...

Reading My Work, and Having Fun

Reading My Work, and Having Fun

For International Women’s Month, I joined poet Hilda Raz and novelist Lynn C. Miller for a celebration of women at the Corrales Community Library What fun we had for the International Women’s Month reading at Corrales Community Library on March 13, 2018. The room was packed with poets and writers and friends as poet Hilda Raz, novelist Lynn C Miller and I shared readings from our work. The themes we chose to explore for this monthlong celebration of women were voice and body image. Many thanks to all who were able to join us. But beyond all of that, and the delicious strawberries provided by the library and Edwina, I learned some interesting things about myself. On the edge I am always a bit on edge before one of these readings. I have always steered pretty clear...

A Writing Life Can Include Art

A Writing Life Can Include Art

  On a recent trip to visit my sister for her birthday, she invited me to play with her in her studio. She has taken up watercolors after years of incredible art quilting. Since I had played with Japanese and Chinese ink brush painting, watercolors sounded like fun to me. For two days, I was enraptured with this new right-brain exercise, and I left Denver with a list of purchases, some of which my generous sister is gifting me. Whatever the artistic process is, it is good to have alternative ways to get the right brain going again when you have unknowingly crossed over to the left brain. When one is writing historically based fiction, the research can comfortably go on forever if one doesn’t push oneself back into right-brain functioning. At least, that is...

Celebrating sisters: Women’s History Month

Celebrating sisters: Women’s History Month

As many of you know from my book Myopia, a memoir, my mother was disabled by an aneurysm at my birth. For the next few years, she was in and out of the hospital for surgeries and forced to take heavy-duty medication that left her sleepy and depressed. My sister was eight years old at the time. Some sisters would have blamed me. After all, she was only eight and very angry at the loss of the mother she had known before I was born. My mother had graduated first in her class in mathematics at the University of Pennsylvania in the 1930s. She was a brilliant and talented woman who was suddenly, overnight, no longer engaged in life. But instead of trying to get rid of me or ignore me, my sister embraced me. She turned the love my father was too busy to receive, and my...

Reflections on the Future

I never had a child of my own, so naturally, I will never have grandchildren. But I have worked with many, many children over the years. For a time, I worked in the Zero to Three Nursery at the Lexington Center in New York. We helped hearing families with deaf children, deaf parents with hearing children and deaf families with deaf children. Some of these cases were quite challenging. In certain instances, we were overjoyed with the progress our families were able to make. Most of these folks could not afford private services. Medicaid was our source of payment. Eventually, the funding was cut. They said the program was too expensive to run. There is no longer any soft place for these families to land. A young friend discovered that her young son has muscular...